New in Cinema 4D Release 17 Quickstart: Take System for Design Iteration

Photo of Cineversity

Instructor Cineversity

Share this video
  • Duration: 09:26
  • Views: 9847
  • Made with Release: 17
  • Works with Release: 17 and greater

Design iterations & layer comps functionality with the C4D R17 Take System.

With the Take System in Cinema 4D Release 17, you can easily develop design concepts and iterations within a single scene file. Learn how to create Takes and Overrides to manage changes to object attributes, animation, material assignments and material attributes. Use Render Tokens to quickly render takes for review, or export animated takes via FBX for use in other applications like Unity.

Less...

Transcript

The take system offers more than just render layers functionality. Because you can store virtually any attribute, including animated attributes, it becomes a powerful system in which to try out concepts and variations. In this scene we're trying out different options for creating trails out of the metaball object and we've stored each variation in its own take. As I select or activate each take you'll immediately see the changes in the viewport playback. And as we look on the right hand side here we can actually see exactly which parameters have been changed from take to take. So here, the exponential falloff is true in the exponential take and in the high hull take the hull value has been increased to 350%. So let's use the take system to create a few more variations for this scene. We'll use the high hull take as a starting point and I'm going to go ahead and right click and choose new child take. The take system is hierarchical so this new take will inherit any of the attribute changes in any of the parent takes and in this case the 350% hull value from the high hull take. For this new take we'll adjust the length of the tracer object that's generating the trails. So I'm going to go ahead and rename this Long Trails and we'll go ahead and make sure that it's active by the indicator to the left of the take name. Now we'll jump over into the object manager and select that tracer object and we want to vary this amount attribute here. And so, I need to go ahead and create what's called an override. An override is basically any attribute that's different in this particular take. So I'm going to right click and choose override from the attribute manager context menu. And once I do that, the attribute is no longer grayed out so I can change the value. So let's go ahead and set a value like 15 so that it's really obvious this change we're making. And now if I play back the animation, you'll see that the metaball trail is much longer than it was before. And if we jump into the takes manager and select the long trails take, we'll go ahead and unfold these and you can see that this take has stored an amount value of 15 for the tracer. Now if we want to adjust this at any time, we don't even have to switch into that take. We can simply double click on the value and change it right here in the pop up attribute manager. So now a value of 10 is going to be used for the long trails. Takes can store animated parameters as well. Let's go ahead and create another take and store a version of this animation that's reversed. So I'm going to go ahead and click the new take button and we'll name this new take reversed. Now the attribute we want to go ahead and change is the position attribute on this aligned to spline tag. It's already been animated in the main take, but we want to override that animation within this reverse take. So I need to once again go ahead and manually create an override. Now I can simply adjust the key frames in order to reverse this animation. So we'll go ahead and swap these and I'm going to go ahead and make the animation a little bit longer as well so that it'll be obvious when we make a change. So now we can play back this animation. You'll see it's reversed and if we go back into the main take or even the high hull take, you'll see that it goes in the original direction. We can also take this reversed take and drag it as a child of any of our other takes to apply the reversed animation onto that take. So we'll drop it as the child of the long trails and now this take will inherit all of the parameters of the high hull and long tails takes but it will also have the reversed animation. So now let's try adding some material variations. We'll jump into the content browser and we'll grab a few different materials from the broadcast library. I'm going to go into the abstract section here and let's grab this blue and purple and we'll drag them into our material manager. Now it's important to keep in mind that when you add new materials, new objects, or new tags into your scene those are going to exist in every take. So if I switch to the main take here, you'll see those same materials. They'll be in every take and the reason why is that the take manager only stores changes in attributes. But that's not really a problem because what you'll just do is set the enabled state to off in your main take, for instance, on objects or tags and then enable them in the desired take. In the case of materials all we have to do this change the material assignments. So let's go ahead and create a couple of new takes and we'll just name these MatA and MatB and I'm going to go ahead and make sure that MatA is enabled both with the indicator to the left side of the take and in the C4D title bar and this time let's go ahead and enable auto takes. This mode works a lot like Cinema 4D's automatic key framing and it automatically creates overrides as you make changes to the scenes. So this can help you work a lot more quickly, but just like auto key framing you have to be careful because sometimes it will overrides for things that you didn't really need. So here we'll go ahead and switch into the object manager and I'm just going to select this first material and drag it on top of our texture tag for the metaball to replace the current texture assignment. So we can see here that that's changed and if we go back into the take manager you'll see that the texture tag property has changed for the material. Now for MatB we need to go ahead and make the same change and if you have the HUD enabled here you can quickly switch between takes using the pop up menu by clicking in the HUD. So you want to make sure that this current take HUD is turned on in your view settings. HUD, activate the current take option here and then we can switch takes just by clicking and selecting a new take from the pop up menu. So now we're in MatB and we'll take this purple material and we're going to drop that on and replace that as well. So now we have takes for MatA with the green color and MatB with the purple color and, of course, our main take still has the gradient. Now of course we can also override the material parameters directly. We'll go ahead and create one more take and call this MatC and we'll still have auto takes enabled and in this case we'll just go into our original gradient material and we'll adjust the color that's being fed into this colorizer. So I'm going to just click on the gradient here and we'll load a preset and we'll just grab, say, these colors here. And now if you look here in the take manager, you can see that we have a shader, colorizer, shader properties and the gradient has been overridden and sometimes you'll just get these dashes if the value can't be shown within this column here but if you click on it you'll actually see the value of the override. So now we have MatC, MatB, MatA, and, of course, our main take with our existing gradients. So now we've got a lot of variations in this scene file and, of course, the option to use render tokens and render each of your takes comes in handy here as well. I can mark a few specific takes, for instance, and I can quickly render hardware previews for each of these. I can pass these around to colleagues or clients for comment and I know by checking the file name which project file, take, and render setting were used to create each video. And I can even see the take burned in as part of the HUD or via the watermark post effect. You can even take the option to store animation in takes a bit further. Here I have a game character and I've stored various animation states in individual takes so I can deal with each animation sequence on its own with its own timeline and I don't have to worry about the keys for the other animation sequences. The FBX import export has been updated to fully support takes so when I export this out as FBX and import this file into another application like Unity, you'll see that all of those individual animations come in as separate clips. Of course this works the other way as well. If you have an FBX file that has motion clips stored within it, those will be imported as takes in Cinema 4D. So here we see the round trip and we have all of our takes still applied. So I hope that gives you a taste of the power of the take system, not just for render layers but for flexible management of multiple variations all within the same scene file.
The take system offers more than just render layers functionality. Because you can store virtually any attribute, including animated attributes, it becomes a powerful system in which to try out concepts and variations. In this scene we're trying out different options for creating trails out of the metaball object and we've stored each variation in its own take. As I select or activate each take you'll immediately see the changes in the viewport playback. And as we look on the right hand side here we can actually see exactly which parameters have been changed from take to take. So here, the exponential falloff is true in the exponential take and in the high hull take the hull value has been increased to 350%. So let's use the take system to create a few more variations for this scene. We'll use the high hull take as a starting point and I'm going to go ahead and right click and choose new child take. The take system is hierarchical so this new take will inherit any of the attribute changes in any of the parent takes and in this case the 350% hull value from the high hull take. For this new take we'll adjust the length of the tracer object that's generating the trails. So I'm going to go ahead and rename this Long Trails and we'll go ahead and make sure that it's active by the indicator to the left of the take name. Now we'll jump over into the object manager and select that tracer object and we want to vary this amount attribute here. And so, I need to go ahead and create what's called an override. An override is basically any attribute that's different in this particular take. So I'm going to right click and choose override from the attribute manager context menu. And once I do that, the attribute is no longer grayed out so I can change the value. So let's go ahead and set a value like 15 so that it's really obvious this change we're making. And now if I play back the animation, you'll see that the metaball trail is much longer than it was before. And if we jump into the takes manager and select the long trails take, we'll go ahead and unfold these and you can see that this take has stored an amount value of 15 for the tracer. Now if we want to adjust this at any time, we don't even have to switch into that take. We can simply double click on the value and change it right here in the pop up attribute manager. So now a value of 10 is going to be used for the long trails. Takes can store animated parameters as well. Let's go ahead and create another take and store a version of this animation that's reversed. So I'm going to go ahead and click the new take button and we'll name this new take reversed. Now the attribute we want to go ahead and change is the position attribute on this aligned to spline tag. It's already been animated in the main take, but we want to override that animation within this reverse take. So I need to once again go ahead and manually create an override. Now I can simply adjust the key frames in order to reverse this animation. So we'll go ahead and swap these and I'm going to go ahead and make the animation a little bit longer as well so that it'll be obvious when we make a change. So now we can play back this animation. You'll see it's reversed and if we go back into the main take or even the high hull take, you'll see that it goes in the original direction. We can also take this reversed take and drag it as a child of any of our other takes to apply the reversed animation onto that take. So we'll drop it as the child of the long trails and now this take will inherit all of the parameters of the high hull and long tails takes but it will also have the reversed animation. So now let's try adding some material variations. We'll jump into the content browser and we'll grab a few different materials from the broadcast library. I'm going to go into the abstract section here and let's grab this blue and purple and we'll drag them into our material manager. Now it's important to keep in mind that when you add new materials, new objects, or new tags into your scene those are going to exist in every take. So if I switch to the main take here, you'll see those same materials. They'll be in every take and the reason why is that the take manager only stores changes in attributes. But that's not really a problem because what you'll just do is set the enabled state to off in your main take, for instance, on objects or tags and then enable them in the desired take. In the case of materials all we have to do this change the material assignments. So let's go ahead and create a couple of new takes and we'll just name these MatA and MatB and I'm going to go ahead and make sure that MatA is enabled both with the indicator to the left side of the take and in the C4D title bar and this time let's go ahead and enable auto takes. This mode works a lot like Cinema 4D's automatic key framing and it automatically creates overrides as you make changes to the scenes. So this can help you work a lot more quickly, but just like auto key framing you have to be careful because sometimes it will overrides for things that you didn't really need. So here we'll go ahead and switch into the object manager and I'm just going to select this first material and drag it on top of our texture tag for the metaball to replace the current texture assignment. So we can see here that that's changed and if we go back into the take manager you'll see that the texture tag property has changed for the material. Now for MatB we need to go ahead and make the same change and if you have the HUD enabled here you can quickly switch between takes using the pop up menu by clicking in the HUD. So you want to make sure that this current take HUD is turned on in your view settings. HUD, activate the current take option here and then we can switch takes just by clicking and selecting a new take from the pop up menu. So now we're in MatB and we'll take this purple material and we're going to drop that on and replace that as well. So now we have takes for MatA with the green color and MatB with the purple color and, of course, our main take still has the gradient. Now of course we can also override the material parameters directly. We'll go ahead and create one more take and call this MatC and we'll still have auto takes enabled and in this case we'll just go into our original gradient material and we'll adjust the color that's being fed into this colorizer. So I'm going to just click on the gradient here and we'll load a preset and we'll just grab, say, these colors here. And now if you look here in the take manager, you can see that we have a shader, colorizer, shader properties and the gradient has been overridden and sometimes you'll just get these dashes if the value can't be shown within this column here but if you click on it you'll actually see the value of the override. So now we have MatC, MatB, MatA, and, of course, our main take with our existing gradients. So now we've got a lot of variations in this scene file and, of course, the option to use render tokens and render each of your takes comes in handy here as well. I can mark a few specific takes, for instance, and I can quickly render hardware previews for each of these. I can pass these around to colleagues or clients for comment and I know by checking the file name which project file, take, and render setting were used to create each video. And I can even see the take burned in as part of the HUD or via the watermark post effect. You can even take the option to store animation in takes a bit further. Here I have a game character and I've stored various animation states in individual takes so I can deal with each animation sequence on its own with its own timeline and I don't have to worry about the keys for the other animation sequences. The FBX import export has been updated to fully support takes so when I export this out as FBX and import this file into another application like Unity, you'll see that all of those individual animations come in as separate clips. Of course this works the other way as well. If you have an FBX file that has motion clips stored within it, those will be imported as takes in Cinema 4D. So here we see the round trip and we have all of our takes still applied. So I hope that gives you a taste of the power of the take system, not just for render layers but for flexible management of multiple variations all within the same scene file.
테이크 시스템은 단순히 렌더 레이어 기능 뿐 아니라 그 외에도 더 많은 것들을 제공합니다. 여러분은 애니메이션되는 속성을 포함하여 거의 모든 속성들을 저장할 수 있기 때문에, 테이크 시스템은 컨셉 및 여러 변형들을 시도해 볼 수 있는 강력한 시스템입니다. 이 씬에서는 메타볼 오브젝트로 만들어진 트레일을 생성하면서 여러 서로 다른 옵션들을 시도해 보고, 이들 각각의 변형들을 자신의 테이크 내에 저장하도록 하겠습니다. 제가 각 테이크를 선택하여 활성화시키면 여러분은 뷰포트 재생에서 그 변화를 곧바로 보실 수 있습니다. 그리고 우리가 여기 오른쪽을 보면 각 테이크 마다 어떤 파라미터들이 실제로 변경되었는지를 볼 수 있습니다. 따라서, 여기서 보듯이 exponential falloff가 exponential 테이크에서는 true로 되어있고, hull 테이크에서는 hull 값이 350%로 키워져 있습니다. 이제 테이크 시스템을사용하여 이 씬의 몇가지 변형들을 생성해 보도록 하겠습니다. 먼저 high hull 테이크를 시작점으로 하여 이를 라이트 클릭하고 새로운 차일드 테이크를 선택합니다. 테이크 시스템은 계층 구조이기 때문에 새로운 테이크는 모든 부모 테이크에서 일어난 어떠한 속성 변경들도 모두 상속됩니다. 따라서 여기서는 high hull 테이크로부터 350%의 hull 값을 물려 받습니다. 이 새로운 테이크에 대하여, 트레일을 생성하는 트레이서 오브젝트의 길이를 조정하겠습니다. 이제 이 테이크의 이름을 Long Trails로 바꾸고 계속 하기 위하여 테이크 이름의 앞에 있는 표시자를 통하여 이 테이크가 활성화 되어있는 것을 확인합니다. 이제 오브젝트 관리자로 가서 트레이서 오브젝트를 선택하고 이 Amount 속성 값을 여기서 변경합니다. 그리고 더 나아가서 오버라이드라고 부르는 것을 생성하여야 합니다. 오버라이드는 기본적으로 이 특정 테이크 내에서 서로 다른 임의의 속성을 의미합니다. 라이트 클릭하고 속성 관리자 컨텍스트 메뉴에서 오버라이드를 선택합니다. 이렇게 하고 나면, 이 속성이 더 이상 그레이 아웃되지않아 이제 값들을 변경할 수 있습니다. 이제 이 값을 15로 설정하면 우리가 만든 변화가 확연히 눈에 들어옵니다. 이제 애니메이션을 재생시키면 메타볼 트레일이 전에 비해 상당히 길어진 것을 보실 수 있습니다. 이제 테이크 매니저로 가서 Long Trails 테이크를 선택하여 이를 펼쳐보면, 이 테이크는 트레이서에 대하여 총 크기 값으로 15가 저장되어있는 것을 볼 수 있습니다. 만일 언재든지 이 값을 조정하고 싶을 경우에는 이 테이크로 전환할 필요도 없습니다. 그냥 이 값을 더블 클릭하고 여기 팝업 속성 관리자에서 직접 값을 변경하면 됩니다. 이제 이 값을 10으로 하여 Long Trails 테이크의 값으로 사용합니다. 테이크는 애니메이션되는 파라미터도 저장할 수 있습니다. 자 이제 또 다른 테이크를 생성하여 이 애니메이션의 변형을 저장하되 반대로 진행되는 애니메이션을 저장하겠습니다. 새 테이크 버튼을 클릭하고 이름을 Reversed라고 하겠습니다. 우리가 변경해야 할 속성은 스플라인에 정렬되어있는 태그 상의 포지션 속성입니다. 이 속성은 이미 메인 테이크 내에서 애니메이션되어있는데, 우리는 이 Reverse 테이크 내에서 이 애니메이션을 재정의(오버라이드)할 것입니다. 따라서 다시 가서 수동으로 Position 오버라이드를 생성합니다. 이제 간단히 이 애니메이션을 반대로 하기 위하여 키프레임을 조정할 수 있습니다. 이를 위해 이들을 서로 뒤바꾸고 애니메이션을 조금 더 길게 만들어서, 변경한 내용이 보다 명확하게 보이도록 하겠습니다. 이에 지 애니메이션을 재생해 보겠습니다. 애니메이션이 완전히 반대로 진행되는 것을 볼 수 있으며, 메인 테이크로 되돌아가거나 high hull 테이크로 가서 보면 여기서는 애니메이션이 원래 방향대로 진행되는 것을 볼 수 있습니다. 우리는 또한 이 reverse 테이크를 드래그하여 다른 테이크의 차일드 테이크로 만들면 반대로 된 애니메이션을 그 테이크에 적용할 수 있습니다. 이제 이 reverse 테이크를 드래그하여 Long trails 테이크의 차일드 테이크로 드롭하면, 이 reverse 테이크는 high hull 테이크와 Long trail 테이크의 모든 속성들을 물려받게 되지만 애니메이션은 반대 방향 애니메이션을 하게됩니다. 이제 몇가지 재질 변경을 추가해 보도록 하겠습니다. 이를 위하여 컨텐트 브라우져로 가서 브로드캐스트 라이브러리에 있는 여러 다른 재질들을 선택하도록 하겠습니다. 이를 위하여 여기 abstraction 섹션으로 가서 블루와 퍼플을 선택하고, 이들을 재질 관리자로 드래그합니다. 여기서 반드시 기억해야 할 가장 중요한 것은 새로운 재질, 새로운 오브젝트 또는 새로운 태그들을 씬에 추가할 때에는 이들은 모든 테이크 내에 존재하게 된다는 것을 명심하십시오. 따라서 여기 이 메인 테이크로 전환해보면, 이 재질들을 여기서도 볼 수 있습니다. 즉, 이들은 모든 테이크 내에 존재하게 되는 데, 그 이유는 테이크 매니저는 단지 속성들의 변화만을 저장하기 때문입니다. 하지만 이 것이 큰 문제가 되지는 않습니다. 왜냐하면, 예를 들어, 오브젝트나 태그의 경우, 메인 테이크에서 활성화 상태를 off로 설정하고 필요한 테이크 내에서 활성화 시키면 됩니다. 재질의 경우에는 재질 지정만 변경하면 됩니다. 이제 재질을 위한 몇개의 새로운 테이크를 만들어 이름을 MatA와 MatB로 하고, MatA를 선택하여 활성화된 상태를 테이크 이름의 왼쪽에 있는 지시자를 통해 확인하거나 C4D 타이틀 바를 통해 확인합니다. 그리고 이번에는 오토 테이크를 활성화 시킵니다. 이 모드는 Cinema 4D의 오토매틱 키프레임과 아주 흡사하게 동작하여, 씬에 변경을 가하면 자동으로 오버라이드를 생성해 줍니다. 따라서, 여러분이 빠르게 작업할 수 있도록 도움을 주지만 오토 키프레임에서와 같이 유의하여야 할 것이 있습니다. 즉, 종종 여러분이 결코 필요치 않은 것들에 대해서도 오버라이드들을 만들기 때문입니다. 그래서 여기서는 오브젝트 관리자로 가서 이 첫번째 재질을 선택하고 이를 드래그하여 메타볼을 위한 텍스쳐 태그의 맨 위로 드래그하여 기존의 지정된 텍스쳐를 교체합니다. 여기서 이 변경이 적용된 것을 볼 수 있고 테이크 매니져로 되돌아가서 보면 재질에 대한 택스쳐 태그 속성이 맞게 변경된 것을 알 수 있습니다. 이제 MatB에 대해서도 동일한 변경을 가할 것입니다. 만일 여기에 HUD가 활성화 되어있다면 HUD를 클릭하여 나타나는 팝업 메뉴에서 보다 빠르게 테이크들 사이를 전환할 수 있습니다. 이를 위해서는 뷰 설정에서 이 Current Take HUD가 On 되어있어야 합니다. HUD에서 Current Take 옵션을 활성화 시키면, 우리는 테이크 전환시 HUD를 클릭하고 팝업에서 새로운 테이크를 선택하면 됩니다. 이제 우리는 MatB에 있고, 이 퍼플 재질을 취해서 드롭하여 이를 교체할 것입니다. 이제 MatA를 위해서는 그린 칼라, MatB를 위해서는 퍼플 칼라를 갖게 되었으며, 물론 우리의 메인 테이크는 아직도 본ㄹ해의 그라디언트를 갖고있습니다. 우리는 물론 재질 파라미터를 직접 오버라이드할 수도 있습니다. 다시 새로운 하나의 테이크를 만들고, 이를 MatC로 이름을 부여합니다. 우리는 아직도 오토 테이크가 활성화되어있기 때문에, 여기서는 본래의 그라디언트 재질로 직접 가서, 이 칼라라이져에 들어갈 칼라를 조정할 것입니다. 따라서, 여기 이 그라디언트를 클릭하여 프리셋을 로드하고 여기 이 칼라를 잡아 적용합니다. 이제 테이크 매니저로 가서 여기 이 곳을 보면, 셰이더, 칼라라이저, 셰이더 속성들과 함께 그라디언트가 오버라이드된 것을 볼 수 있습니다. 종종 대시만 보이고, 여기 이 칸이 너무 작아서 값이 보이지 않을 때가 있는 데, 이런 경우 이를 클릭하면 오버라이드된 값들을 보실 수 있습니다. 자 이제 우리는 MatC, MatB, MatA 그리고 본래의 그라디언트를 가진 메인 테이크가 있습니다. 우리는 이제 이 씬 파일 내에 여러 가지 변형들을 갖게 되었으며 물론, 렌더 토큰을 사용하여 각각의 테이크를 아주 쉽게 렌더링할 수 있는 옵션도 갖고있습니다. 이제 몇개의 테이크를 마크하여 이들 각각의 테이크들을 빠르게 하드웨어 프리뷰로 렌더링해 보겠습니다. 그리고 이들을 동료나 고객에게 보내 의견을 들어볼 수도 있는데, 이때 파일 이름을 확인하여 쉽사리 어떤 프로젝트 파일, 테이크 및 렌더 설정이 각 비디오에 사용되었는지를 알 수 있습니다. 또한 HUD의 일부분으로 버닝된 또는 워터마크 효과를 통하여 테이크를 볼 수도 있습니다. 여러분은 또한 애니메이션을 테이크 안에 저장할 수 있는 옵션을 활용할 수도 있습니다. 여기 게임 캐릭터가 있는데, 여러 애니메이션 상태들을 각각의 테이크들에 저장하여 각각의 애니메이션 시퀀스를 자신의 타임라인을 갖고 다룰 수 있어 다른 애니메이션 시퀀스에 대한 키 값들을 염려할 필요가 없습니다. FBX 임포트 및 익스포트 또한 테이크를 완벽히 지원하도록 업데이트되어, FBX로 이를 익스포트하여 Unity와 같은 다른 어플리케이션 안으로 이 FBX 파일을 임포트시 이 모든 개별 애니메이션들이 별도의 클립으로 들어오는 것을 보실 수 있습니다. 물론 이 반대의 경우도 마찬가지로 동작하여, FBX 파일을 C4D 안으로 임포트 할 때, 모션 클립들을 가진 FBX 파일은 C4D 안으로 임포트될 때, 이들 모션 클립들이 테이크로 임포트됩니다. 따라서 여기서 익스포트하고 다시 임포트해보면 우리의 모든 테이크들이 계속 적용되어있는 상태임을 알 수 있습니다. 이상으로 테이크 시스템의 강력함 특히, 렌더 레이어로서 뿐 아니라 동일한 파일 내에 여러 모든 변형들을 포함시킬 수 있는 유연한 관리 시스템을 맛 보셨으리라 믿습니다.
Resume Auto-Scroll?